General Assembly approves October 15th: Night of 500 Tents!

On 10/12 the General Assembly for Occupy Seattle passed the following proposal:

“To call for and plan a mass occupation of Westlake Park with tents starting Saturday, October 15, 2011 in solidarity with the worldwide Occupy Movements.”

Seattle needs your help to reclaim our occupation. We can not maintain our space unless we attain critical mass, and we need everyones help to do it. Seattle is one of the top corporate head quarters of the world. It is important for the integrity of this movemenet and this country that we the people of the great north west let the powers that be, the powers that surround us, know that this occupation is not going anywhere. So this Saturday, bring your tents, and your sunday best.

Meet at West Lake center, and we will decide from there where we will set up base camp.

Show your support of this event on Facebook, go say you’re attending!

107 Responses to General Assembly approves October 15th: Night of 500 Tents!

  • calvinpriest says:

    Please help us build for this event, so that we can get as many people to Westlake on Saturday as possible. We have a flyer and poster made, and we need help getting the word out. Let’s make it so no one can walk past a telephone pole without hearing about our occupation movement!

    Flyer: http://pariscommune.org/500tents.pdf
    Poster: http://pariscommune.org/poster500tents.pdf

    • Epiphany says:

      October 15th is a day of uniting for #globalchange that has been planned for longer even than Adbusters original OWS call. It is very disappointing to see OS turn what could have been a great day of solidarity with 99% brothers and sisters around the globe protesting the global monarchy of money into a tax, war and camping issue. It’s bigger than all of those petty things. It’s global, not national and it’s too bad “progressive” Seattle couldn’t see that…

      http://15october.net/spread-it/

    • forrest says:

      Because this is supposed to be an extremely democratic process, it needs to be considered WHY the issues are of tents and westlake: THE MAJORITY OF PARTICIPANTS ARE HOMELESS AND THEIR NEEDS ARE BEING ACCURATELY REPRESENTED.

      The opinion that I have formed, after spending a night there (watching nearly all the participants who are NOT homeless, LEAVE AND GO HOME) is that the homeless people are more active in this instance of democracy than the others. If you want it to be about something other than tents and camping, COME DOWN TONIGHT AND SAY SO, AND BRING PEOPLE.

  • karmashand35 says:

    I don’t understand. I thought this was about fighting the national problems at a national level. Westlake is not a national park. Here is the idea AGAIN. Say there are 150 of you fulltime. 50 sleep at city hall for 8 hrs at at time; while there are still 100 at Westlake awake at all times. No tents there, so they can’t say you are camping. Now, you have met their demands and still kept the park occupied.

    • Geoff Occupy Briggs says:

      I agree. The campers are brave and passionate. But their focus on their right to camp has overshadowed the larger issues of economic and social justice and left Seattlites who want to mobilize in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street feeling left out. I fear this is leading to a vicious cycle where those committed to tents at Westlake dominate the GA and perpetuate their cause at the exclusion of the 99% of the 99% who have not yet turned out because this protest does not speak to the injustices we are witnessing or the solutions we want to explore. Sure there are signs and slogans decrying banks and corporatocracy but instead of taking direct action to their door step it looks like Occupy Seattle is more interested in picking a fight with the mayor.

      This sentiment is evident all over the OS website and FB page, and has been common in my conversations with folks the last few times I have joined the occupation. In less sympathetic forums we are being described as selfish and misguided. I know that is not accurate but I believe we are being short sighted. Remember, for this movement to be successful it must grow much much larger, and if it does the vast majority of the participants will never camp. Occupation comes in many forms. Camping is just one of them.

      • ElanaA says:

        Right now I feel as if my focus is “to camp or not to camp?” rather than just getting on down there to show solidarity with the overall movement. Seattle needs more support; this argument about tents in Westlake is distancing supporters and keeping them away.

        • Denise Henrikson says:

          I completely agree with ElanaA and others. This movement is about PEOPLE VS PROFIT, not Westlake vs City Hall. Let’s focus our collective energy on getting the word out about this Satuday’s (Oct. 15) Global Day of Protest and writing/ calling our elected officials and holding them accountable to the people, not the banksters.

          • MCFADDEN_LIVES says:

            This whole “tent” thing is getting really boring. We have a global protest day Saturday with 70+ countries joining in and all Seattle can do is complain about tents. I agree with the person who stated earlier “OWS: Protest by day and disband, come back next day”. When protests aren’t going on in that area and a homeless guy tries sleeping in that area, cops will generally kick them out. So people protesting who already have homes and nice camping gear, go to the Cascades or something if you are so dead set on using it. I’m showing up 50+ strong Saturday to PROTEST THE BANKS, ECONOMY AND GOVERNMENT. Isn’t that what this is about people? Get on the same page….sounds like a lot of us already are.

      • prhiannon says:

        I agree. It appears that a minority of people have become very focused on a diversionary issue, which involves Making a Point Against Authority Figures, rather than the real issues of economic injustice. They’re behaving in ways that make most of us, regular people who are pretty angry about being shafted by the 1%, feel like this movement is being run by a bunch of yahoos, and we don’t really support that. We don’t want to be part of that.

        In other words, something is happening which undermines support for the real movement against economic abuse and injustice, and creates a smokescreen that obscures the real message: WE ARE THE 99% AND WE ARE WAKING UP.

        Interestingly, the same thing is happening in Portland. There, the diversionary issue is the closing of Main Street downtown.

        In both cases it appears that the majority of people involved in and supporting the Occupy movements don’t support these diversionary issues. But there appears to be a vocal “leadership” that is pushing those agendas anyway.

        Could it be possible that this is not just a coincidence? That it’s actually a strategy to undermine and disempower the Occupy movement here in the Northwest?

        We know there have been “plants” in NYC who have tried to provoke the protesters to do stupid things. And there are well established activist networks in this part of the country which have inconvenienced the 1% in the past (people are still talking about the WTO protests). Why would they NOT have arranged for “plants” to be among them?

        I’m not being paranoid, just practical. This is what they do when there are protest movements. It happened in the 60s, as those of you who were around then will recall; the government even admitted it then. It happens all the time, all over the world. (Or do you think the global corporations and the governments in their pockets would NOT do something like that? Because they are such ethical people, and so unwilling to spend money to protect their interests?)

        And: Seattle and Portland, shooting themselves in the foot in exactly the same ways. I mean, you can just see the guys in the boardrooms figuring out how to manipulate our PNW activist psyches. (They probably used dry-erase boards and PowerPoint presentations.)

        It’s just too interesting a coincidence not to comment on.

  • ElanaA says:

    Planning on joining on the 15th; I’d like to help distribute posters/fliers on the east side but feel the message/tagline is really narrow as to the issues being represented. A large part of the nation-wide protest (and the crux of many of the issues we face) has to do with the issue of corporate greed and giving citizen’s rights and Constitutional protections to corporations, who are not people — the fact that they are essentially buying our elections and manipulating our political processes, unchecked. I would like to strongly suggest that you add an additional tagline to the effect of “Help take our government back from the corporations” and/or “Demand Democracy, not Corporatocracy!”
    My 2 cents, but I think adding the appeal will give a message that is more representative of the 99%.

  • msmikestew35 says:

    As of yesterday, we need to register to make comments. Why was this change made? I noticed quite a number of people who commented on the class nature of the issues we face. After the change to register commenters was made, I noticed that these people stopped commenting and right wing posts increased a lot.

    Just look through the posts that claim the rich are fairly taxed.

    The question is what were the organizers planning to achieve by asking users to register? To scare socialists by asking them for their personal email? To make sure the discussion does not develop a class consciousness?

    There are lots of mostly young people who are risking arrest, possible bodily harm. The organizers need to answer why by their actions, they have so far stifled any political discussion. These young people are not here to walk behind Obama and the Democratic party. Been there done that, I would think.

  • msmikestew35 says:

    As of yesterday, we need to register to make comments. Why was this change made? I noticed quite a number of people who commented on the class nature of the issues we face. After the change to register commenters was made, I noticed that these people stopped commenting and right wing posts increased a lot.

    Just look through the posts that claim the rich are fairly taxed.

    The question is what were the organizers planning to achieve by asking users to register? To scare socialists by asking them for their personal email? To make sure the discussion does not develop a class consciousness?

    There are lots of mostly young people who are risking arrest, possible bodily harm. The organizers need to answer why by their actions, they have so far stifled any political discussion. These young people are not here to walk behind Obama and the Democratic party. Been there done that, I would think.

  • Richard Wells says:

    Oooh! Ahhh! That’s how it always starts. But later there’s screaming and running.
    Jurassic Park (The Movie)
    (also posted at The Slog)

    Trying to get this straight. The city’s offer: a dry place to sleep, first amendment permits for Westlake Park.

    OW’s concessions: disassemble at night, reassemble in the morning.

    At first I thought this was a containment, but now it looks like a victory. A dry place to sleep in exchange for not sleeping in the rain. That’s a win, isn’t it?

    This is not about sleeping at Westlake Park. Westlake is not even an effective symbol, Wall Street is the symbolic location. Setting up 500 tents on Saturday is deliberately confrontational, and a good way to keep a very large percentage of the rest of us 99%’ers away. I thought this was about isolating, illuminating, and breaking the strangle hold the 1% have on our world.

    Sleeping at Westlake was a good tactic, it’s not anymore. If we need to get arrested, let’s get arrested for something more meaningful than that.

    The whole world is watching all of us.

    • MCFADDEN_LIVES says:

      Sleeping at Westlake was a good tactic, it’s not anymore. If we need to get arrested, let’s get arrested for something more meaningful than that.

      The whole world is watching all of us.

      AGREED! Where’s a LIKE button when you need one? lol

  • Denise Henrikson says:

    October 15 (Saturday) – PROTEST / DEMONSTRATION
    Occupy Seattle – Global Day of Action
    Join us for a day of Global Action, protest and solidarity with the Occupy Seattle folks. Food , Music, Action! http://occupyseattle.org/ If not us, who? If not now, when? more…
    Occupy Seattle
    You might also be interested in checking out this video about it:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyziG5bUuBE

  • Justice Begets Peace says:
  • Justice Begets Peace says:

    My Advice to the Occupy Wall Street Protesters: Hit bankers where it hurts

    [url]http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/my-advice-to-the-occupy-wall-street-protesters-20111012[/url]

  • kmckenzie says:

    Please don’t make this about tents, it trivializes the importance of what you are doing. I was at Westlake last Saturday and had hoped to be there this Saturday, joining in what I thought would be a universal effort to forward our goals. I am disappointed that has devolved into a face-off over camping. Please reconsider.

  • Emilia J says:

    I wholeheartedly agree with what is being said here. As several people have pointed out, the city’s offer of sleeping in tents at City Hall is not only reasonable, it is better for the movement than staying at Westlake / in jail if we want to continue the Occupation long term and bring in more people. We can stay in tents at City Hall at night and be at Westlake or wherever else we want to go during the day. There is no need to make the mayor and SPD our enemies. Picking a fight with the city will only bring negative publicity, make people less willing to join the Occupation, and distract us from the real problems we came out to protest against in the first place. I’m worried that we’re losing sight of the big picture; if we want our movement to be taken seriously we need to focus on the serious issues and fight for economic and social justice for the 99% nationwide (and worldwide). Let’s not let our cause be overshadowed by confrontations over camping in Westlake Park.

    • ANON2012 says:

      Staying shows bravery, resolve and seriousness in this movement. Being shuffled around at the city’s whims is just relenting to the powers we are fighting. It’s this passive aggressiveness that is so rampant in Seattle, imho, is what is screwing it up for everyone. Many people are refusing to see the big picture, moving now will then throw the power into their hands to do as they please with OUR OCCUPATION!

      Occupying a space is to do so without permits, without violence, without permission. It’s taking a stand against these manipulative powers of city government and police.

      Stand proud, stand brave but above all else —- stand in solidarity.

      • Passionateyetapprehensive says:

        I think you might be refusing to see the big picture… the big picture is Occupy Seattle is going to LOOSE support if they change what we are fighting for!!!!! It is about solidarity, like you said, camping and tents is not solidarity. Occupy Wall Street does not have tents!!!!! They are following city regulations as to continue the movement! They see the big picture!

        • Shadouwolf says:

          Have you seen the coverage the occupation has been getting?? Very little if any at all. The mayor wants us to move to city hall because it is out of the way and not nearly as high profile. If we move to City hall, that will be a major loss of momentum and a HUGE lack of exposure. If they arrest people for peacefully sitting in a park, THAT will raise awareness. THAT will draw exposure. THAT will show people we are committed to this cause. The way to get things changed is not giving in to the whims of the government. Look at the sixties as an example. Sit-ins, civil disobedience, and the like are what won the changes they were after. Nothing else.
          Occupy Wall Street is doing the same as we are…occupying a park that has “hours of operation”. There is threats the mayor is going to have them moved or arrested. Do you think they are going to leave and say “Well the MAYOR said we could move over here!” No. when it comes down to it…they will stay, just like we should stay where we are at now.

          • MCFADDEN_LIVES says:

            That’s a good point. With high profile areas bring more of a risk, but at least that’s where the cameras are pointed.

          • Passionateyetapprehensive says:

            I absolutely agree with protesting at Westlake! What I don’t think the movement should focus on is setting up tents and camping there. If I am not mistaken that is the only source of contention with the Mayors Office; sleeping at Westlake. In fact if those who want to protest the camping, want to protest the camping by all means!! I just don’t think the Global Day of Action should be turned into the Night of 500 tents.

          • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

            I HAVE CALLED AND EMAILED THE MAYOR, CITY COMPLAINT OFFICE, CITY ATTORNEY, AND THE POLICE DEPARTMENT AS A CITIZEN OF DOWNTOWN SEATTLE ASKING THAT YOU be ARRESTED AFTER THE 10PM CURFEW. I agree with your right to protest and to waste your time during the day, but leave at night. Your collective intelligence is like a nightlight..you can only expect it to shine a little.

          • huddie98 says:

            I agree with most of what Shadouwolf says. McGinn and the police would love nothing better than to domesticate OS and to move it out from the public eye and watch it slowly disappear. The discussion of tents may seem distracting at the moment, but even in disagreement it keeps the 99% engaged and active. Will everyone continue to show up if occupation moves, hopefully so, but until then, let’s not fragment off picking sides. Show up!

          • BryceTheDragon says:

            my understanding is that we can demonstrate in Westlake Park during the day, even if the GA decides to take the offer and make basecamp at City Hall. The less ‘stuff’ you have at Westlake, the more room for Occupiers. You can still be at Westlake every day, so why not clear space for people and set up HQ elsewhere? OS is far from domesticated- you will know that it is domesticated when you are told when and where to protest…tents and basecamp are just details- you can still hold the park daily.

      • treefrog says:

        I agree that the big picture is not whether or not we set up tents in Westlake, but rather whether or not we can get enough support to change the current economic practices. We don’t have an enemy in this movement; we have a goal. By trying to make an enemy out of the city, the whole protest starts to be discredited and appear unreasonable. The big point of this movement is solidarity, but some of the 99%ers are discouraged from joining because of the disagreement about the tents. It doesn’t matter if people don’t sleep at Westlake; we won’t get much publicity in the middle of the night anyway. We do have the option of taking shifts sleeping at city hall and staying in Westlake, but there is no point in sleeping there just to show that we can.

  • revilorecneps says:

    Occupy Seattle is something that I think I agree with, but the reason I have not physically joined your protests is that I believe they will be largely ineffective as currently organized. The issue of how long you get to camp at Westlake Park is a sideshow. Westlake Park versus City Hall is a sideshow. Confrontations with the police and Mayor McGinn are a sideshow. The “Occupy Wherever” protests should have some very specific, concrete goals. Some suggestions might include: (1) a second phase of protests that would include the organization of a national boycott of the products and services of all corporations currently lobbying for a repatriation tax holiday, (2) the development of and fund-raising for lobbying organizations that specifically advocate for tax reform benefiting middle and lower income people-this can happen at the local, state, and national level, (3) a demand for a re-vote on President Obama’s American Jobs Act, (4) protests outside the offices of Congresspeople who did not vote for the American Jobs Act, (5) a national march on Washington (with specific demands) to bring issues of economic inequality to the attention of politicians, the media, and the public. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who is a man I deeply admire, would be proud of your protests, but he would advise you to develop specific goals. During his life he led a protest in Albany, Georgia in 1962 that he later felt was largely ineffective, because it was a general protest against segregation, and did not have specific goals. Dr. King knew a few things about protesting. Please do not make the mistake of protesting against the general evils of economic inequality without demanding to get something that is truly useful in return for your activities. Protests with specific goals are good. Protests against the general evil of the ways in which society is structured are too nebulous in form and function to accomplish much of note.

    • Adi says:

      I agree with the comments that this movement should stay focused on Wall Street and our corrupt political system and about bringing attention to the injustices perpetrated by corporations and politicians. Below is an article about the Repatriation Tax Holiday that seems to be moving along and the only benefits will again go to the corporations:

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/13/repatriation-tax-holiday-corporate-power-occupy-wall-street_n_1000900.html

    • EddieD says:

      I have been supporting this movement since its beginning and have marched on a few occasions. You should definitely join, at least come out to march, if you agree with it. I believe, at this moment, we cannot put out clear demands to Washington because, currently, we are at the periphery, which they can avoid, and also, our demands are “radical,” at least it should be “radical” from the outset to those in power. We cannot make the mistake of Obama and the Democrats of beginning in the middle in a negotiation, and then have the other side water it down to nothing. We have to begin with radical demands, otherwise nothing will change. What is the movements’ short and long-term goals:
      - I think the ultimate goal is, as you have said, a propos MLK, OCCUPY WASHINGTON EN MASSE UNTIL WE GET WHAT WE DEMAND. LIKE THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT! Imagine all the Occupy Movements in Washington demanding and NOT LEAVING. It would be bigger than the Civil Right’s Movement.
      - All revolutions point to this. Tahrir Square in the heart of the Capitol, Athens, St. Petersburg. We have to remember decision makers and the seat of change is in Washington. So far, we are on the periphery. I don’t discourage this, movements begin locally and then we have to become national, universal even.
      - The danger is we will be satisfied with cosmetic reforms. I see today on NYT that they are giving “harsher sentences” to Wall Street criminals. This is after the fact when they have decimated an economy, destroyed the lives of millions of people, gotten away with their huge trough of legal funds. DO NOT FORGET IT IS A MOVEMENT ABOUT THE SYSTEM ITSELF (and I hate to capitalize)! Do you know about the thousands of ways Wall Street is preparing for us our next Bubble & Burst? Nano-trading, massive overseas investments, meaning all wealth in this country is leaving overseas, from recent news (but we all guessed this before as well), blatant insider trading, which means those who are connected profit goes up, the masses get the downs. This country is already a 99% service economy for the 1% rich.
      - Sorry to rant. But about our movement. The danger is we will lose our momentum. Do you see yourself occupying in 2 weeks, 3 months with nothing happening? We have to face the fact that we cannot stay there in cold weather indefinitely (although the Russians had there revolution in October and November). I think we all need to gather, pool and plan our resources, to occupy a single square in the capitol, like in Tahrir, and make our demands or take it ourselves.

      • revilorecneps says:

        O.K. Mr. Bolshevik (joking), but if you do not have a specific list of demands, the power structure has nothing to respond to. Like it or not, the power structure has to probably participate in a reform or re-building process. Violent revolution is not really possible. The military and the police would crush that, and it is also morally repugnant. Nonviolent revolution is possible, but without a platform of specific issues to rally around, you are a rebel without a cause.

        I agree with what is being conveyed in the New York Times article, and I think that the movement should also be calling for harsher sentences for those who committed fraud in the financial industry and an expansion of the scope of the investigations by the FBI and the Department of Justice into that fraud.

        Something that both Ralph Nader and Ron Paul agree on is that there needs to be ballot access reform to make it easier for third party candidates to compete in elections. I think this should be another goal of the movement, other than those I have already mentioned in my previous post. You will not get me out on the streets and braving the cold without some specific goals. I am not saying “no”. I am saying, I will wait and see, before I act.

        • EddieD says:

          Thank you for calling me a Bolshevik. Do you know what the term historically signifies. It just means the WORKING CLASS who are politically active. It is not the devil, or Stalinist maniac. Get out of the Cold War mentality. This is not the McCarthy era. I am actually a small business owner who worked in international trade, but my business went down because of the global economy.
          My point was, we cannot have a demand when we are peripheral. We have to go to Washington and demand. You said yourself that MLK failed in those smaller states, so taking that lesson, we go to the Capitol and make the demands.
          - Sorry, but you have to know this is a radical movement, always has been and always will be. Just like Martin Luther King was really a radical AT THAT TIME. Now, we say “oh, of course he was a liberal like us.” No, at that time, he was radical than the left and the right. That was the only way to gain equality. LBJ from Texas was president. Think about it. Right now, the Left has to put our demands without shame or fear before the American public, unfortunately not through the Democrats and Obama. We tolerated them for so long mixing with monied interest. We didn’t realize, shame on us, that they were already owned by them. Disappointed liberals never realized this when they were so excited about Obama. Now they do, and they are angry.

    • seespikerun says:

      we need to grow the movement and the only way to do that is to get engaged and show up to the protests. I agree that we need a lot more focus and specific demands, but that said, i think we need to stock the flames of the fire while its in the public eye now…if more people would come down and join in…and participate in the general assembly then maybe we can steer the movement away from the more radical members …no offense to the die hard revolutionaries (you guys are there every day in the wind and rain …you make it real.) so bottom line, come down and voice your views in person, its a democratic movement, we need more moderate voices to speak up. Often times those who yell the loudest and say the most outlandish things get the media coverage and mic, but it doesnt have to be that way with this movement.

  • heathersolarseed says:

    I wanted the move to City Hall, but these last two days I have come to understand why the majority stood their ground to hold Westlake. This is my perspective of the emotional landscape of Seattle. In 1999, the world brought their grievances to our door and brought our city and the WTO temporarily to its knees. We held the space for that great outrage and a part of our city for a time was essentially the equivalent a militarized zone. People were involved who didn’t want to be, and it scared them. Teargas floating up elevator shafts of occupied office buildings where people were working and living. That was not the beginning, never is, but it is a wound that may only now be possible to heal, and the relationship with the citizens of Seattle and the police must be healed. I did not understand it until the nights I remained at Westlake until 3 or 4am witnessing the choices made by officers to pressure protesters off and on through the night even though the Mayor’s rep had come down to once again reinforce the decision to allow the protesters to remain there for that night, the next night. And some of those same officers will have a totally reasonable, compassionate conversation too. They, like all of us, have been defined by the systems they work within. And, because police departments around the world have often failed their citizenry, movements like this become a moment when a large group of people want to stop being bullied by any system where any injustice has been ignored and instead, be allowed to speak their grievance, and sit on a piece of land that they have a stake in either by way of having paid their taxes or through the important job of earth stewardship…even if that land, honestly, doesn’t belong to any of us.

    People don’t want to hear police are just doing their job when batons and mace are always the threat. And the people occupying the space feel they are doing their job too; it’s just not a paid position, so it’s not being acknowledged as valuable to the society yet. I hated hearing a man tell me stories of treating children in the ER who had been maced during activism such as this before. Not this one, but the sense rolling around was more like not yet, and that’s really sad that the people feel so collectively that the police would resort to that just to clear a park. It doesn’t matter if the reality is true or not, whether those conversations have been had or not within departments: it remains that the majority of people who pass through the square think the police have lost their way when it comes to the oath of protecting its citizens. And, I hate blaming police officers for everything that has gone wrong with us as human beings because it’s a very narrow view of the human spirit, the human condition. Still, when something is out of balance, way out of balance, when we lose our way, any of us as people, we have to figure out how to get people to actually listen so we can fix it. You know times have changed when someone who participated in the WTO protest says let’s move to City Hall. I mean, seriously, on the ground, whether it’s individual officers, or individual protesters, lots and lots of people are searching themselves for the right way to participate in this important moment. It is not about a public park or camping, and yet those things are holding an important place for bigger conversations if we are willing to step back and listen.

    The city and the police are still trying to decide what is more important: Westlake or the World, the people in Westlake may be simply saying, well, we have to remain here until you decide. Westlake has become for me a symbol of whether or not the people of Seattle in government, houses or on the street, are willing to shift their perspective long enough to listen to what 1386 cities around the world are coming together to say. I think the people want to hear the Mayor say the people are just doing their job and we should let them get to it. You don’t even know what we have to say or share because you have us so busy arguing over a place to have the conversation.

    The fundamental question of Westlake turned into a fundamental question of when do we (at what moment, if not now), stand up for our right to assemble as people? What if we decide another location is better and it seems peculiar too, but it turns out that it has some kind of deep First Nations (Native American) roots that somehow facilitates the right energy? Do you know that every day energy workers come to clear the space at Westlake? To clear out the space. What if Westlake is already the right place for right now and we just don’t know it because the concrete covered up the land and we don’t always see ways to heal even when they stand right in front of us? It just takes shifting your perspective to wonder why do people hold steady to something? Sometimes there are bigger things at work. Sometimes the messengers are not what you expected. That may just be a test to you if you can look inside at the collective whole.

    We live in a country that already ignores its homeless population as if that person sleeping on cold, hard pavement does not somehow affect us individually through the collective heart and mind. Westlake is a place where many homeless occupied long before this movement.

    Will it take 10, 20, 30 million people losing their homes to bend the rules to take a listen? In 2008, foreclosures rose 81%. In 2010, one in every 45 homes received a foreclosure notice. Can you feel that? I mean FEEL it. Maybe not because the words “homeless, foreclosure, economic collapse” just float by so much. The media saturates our minds and we can’t handle it. Literally, our care impulse just can’t kick in because it hurts. We lose 137 plant, animal and insect species every single day due to rainforest deforestation. Every 365 days we lose about 50,000 species, and we are on that list now (look around the world). It’s not like y2k. This is actually real. The path is unsustainable and the other species have taken a big hit and now we are on every level of our existence. Antidepressants are the number one drug prescribed in America: in 2009, 190 million people had to pop a pill to get through the day. How many now? You do a search to find out.

    Last month, indigenous people in South America stood in solidarity with their kids in the middle of the Amazon ready to fight if it came to that for the forest, halting a dam project (one of the biggest in the world) from destroying the land. They know that there is so little left to work with on this earth, so little holding this planet together, they have only the one choice. A chief cried and his picture was spread around fb. A chief cried. Can you FEEL that? If a chief cries, so can we, eventually, by waking up and having this conversation.

    I agree, Westlake is not an ideal location for the winter. The conditions are already harsh. Some people have already had hypothermia. Would they put themselves on the line like that if it wasn’t, well, kind of important? I’d like to see us be able to get on with looking at our sustainable location solution, including City Hall. But this is a people’s movement. The people gave everyone else (the 1% and our lawmakers) long enough to find solutions and have these conversations, and they simply didn’t do it, couldn’t do it, or won’t do it. This will stop being a blame game and become a dynamic democratic process for prioritizing the most important needs of our time once lawmakers and law enforcers let us get to work. Things have failed for us all and will continue to until we are left with nothing left to work with. This is our Amazon.

    Last night was an important night. In my opinion, there was no other rational choice. The people want to have a chance to be heard, and every effort to silence pressurizes. I actually stood out of the vote last night because the only way I could stand in solidarity was to stay. I didn’t need to express my dissent this time because I trusted the people, maybe for the first time ever. It’s like in any relationship…if you do not offer some ease, how can anything get done? Last night the Mayor’s office offered to negotiate, but it was 8pm and we were told we had until 10pm. It is a General Assembly of hundreds of people. When the protest march arrived at City Hall earlier that evening, I am told the Mayor was inside but would not or could not (in his heart or politics) come out to talk; he wanted representatives sent inside instead. But the people are outside right now. It’s cold and rainy, but we are trying to bring the conversation outside of the political doors and into the squares and parks of America, just like the founders of our country would have done. The guiding principle of this movement is to remain leadership-less. Yes, we form work groups and present ideas and vote, but we try very hard to keep people from taking a leadership stand for the whole. And sure, anyone can theoretically go talk to the Mayor, and if you show up last minute, you will be talking to one of his aides. So, the fact that he’d make time for a few on the inside is helpful, but I think this movement is ringing the bell that this is the time to stop operating by the book and have this conversation before it’s too late, and not everyone is there yet. But we have to get there, together, somehow.

    Decisions about the future of our economy were decided long ago by elite decision makers. Momentum to dismantle the earth was placed in motion long ago by greed. People began to shut themselves down and form walls of protection for themselves separate from the collective and it seeped into our consciousness that somehow that was the way to survive. Today, our survival depends on coming together and helping the greater good and the earth. It will come from supporting this movement in whatever way is possible. For some, that is be willing to sleep on the cold concrete and risk arrest. For some in other cities, it has meant a bloody beating to the heart and head. For some, they roll up at Westlake with donations of food, clothing, blankets. Some families come down with hot soup pots, baked goods, and their kids. For some, it’s just wondering what the heck is going on. For some, it may be backing down and letting the movement have their voice and trusting that sometimes by doing it totally different you will end up somewhere totally different and this could be that time if we can find a way to trust each other.

    So, for yesterday, being forced out when respect has broken down between the protesters and the police and the Mayor just didn’t, in my opinion, resonate with the human beings at General Assembly. I wanted to leave, but I chose to stay and devote my heart to a vision of our future potential, and understanding that this will transform from a minor battle to a real, life-changing conversation for the city and our world once people are willing to come together.

    And that coming together began to trickle in last night. At 3:30am, a young man was sweeping Westlake Plaza while several officers were calmly talking with one another. There was no sirens, lights flashing, bull horn calls of possible arrests or curfew, no one ripped from their place on the earth. People just held the space and some went home and others remained, including the police. A man showed up with a huge pot of vegetarian stew around 2am. The homeless and the ones with homes ate together. The vibe just started to shift. People in the community came and went all night. It really was the beginning of something new for me.

    Shifts take time, and flexibility, and acknowledgment of the pains in people’s hearts. People put this much on the line when they care, it’s that simple. They don’t do it to hurt others. They do it because they are called deeply to serve. Activists throughout the world who have been doing everything from saving a river to a school to a homeless shelter, whatever the need for the people, are just coming out together to talk in the public’s eye about what has gone wrong. And so are the homeless, youth, and jobless. And so are the angry, the hurt, the dying. I thought this kind of activism was “dead” in terms of how it could serve humanity, until a First Nations Chief said to me last month, when I was on my knees, “We take care of our people.” I guess I do too, even when I don’t agree with them, like last night. I stuck around and I took care of people. And it felt wonderful, and easy.

    The movement is about trusting the people, going with the flow of the millions and soon tens of millions around the world. Come to General Assembly if you want your heart heard or healed. That is where we create a democracy using humanity. We are all welcomed to be a part of that.
    6:30pm at Westlake tonight.

    Peace in, out & about

    p.s. I speak for myself as a human being. I do not represent Occupy Seattle. And, I am not going to engage in a dialogue online either. I will be at General Assembly as many nights as I can, so please find me there. And bring your kids. My son often gets bored.

    • ANON2012 says:

      Thank you for taking the time to write this. I found many valid points within this text and I found myself agreeing with most of it.

    • MCFADDEN_LIVES says:

      “This is our Amazon”.

      My favorite line in all that. I will see you Saturday night. We are 99%. We are one people.

  • Passionateyetapprehensive says:

    I agree with most of the comments, I am really disappointed. I have researched, watched and read material about the occupy movement since it started and I had just reached the point to take action. I planned to come out the first time on Saturday for the Global Day of Action, I’m not sure anymore… This 500 Tents movement in Seattle has derailed me! Frankly, I don’t care about sleeping at Westlake. I want to stand in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street!!! If the GA wants many more individuals derailed who planned to join in on the Global Day of Action, I suggest the GA rethink their priorities. THIS IS NOT ABOUT SEATTLE!!!!!!!!! This is about a shift in consciousness, a realization that this country is being controlled by the 1%!!! Please don’t make it about tents, or Westlake or even the Seattle’s demands. This is about Solidarity and encouraging the entire 99% to come out. I am a safe, homebody but none the less part of the 99% please make this inclusive not exclusive. I want to be included… I am the 99%.

    • MCFADDEN_LIVES says:

      My small group of 50+ will be out with black shirts, blue jeans and the right kind of BurmaShave-esq protest signs. you’re free to stand and protest with us. we don’t plan on camping. we want to promote mobilization and organization at the rally and show others that it’s a bigger message than camping Downtown. you are, we are, the majority is 99%!

      • Passionateyetapprehensive says:

        Thank you! Ill be looking out!

      • office dude says:

        We have actually been discussing the “black shirt and jeans” thing since last night. I also mentioned it at the office today. Further, you speak much wisdom and, with the exception of “supertroll,” there are a lot of intelligent and rational posts on this board. Imo anyway. I really want to get folks down there but the 99% that I know have no interest in camping. So, I hope to be down there looking for you guys. Any clue what your signs will focus on? I.E. What *specific* issues? For me, it’s out of control banks, expensive wars, unfair tax codes, and affordable healthcare.

  • Justice Begets Peace says:
  • MCFADDEN_LIVES says:

    I don’t know where else to put this…from OWS.org

    “WE NEED YOUR HELP!!!! In Spokane, Washington we have been informed by a city official that we must break up the occupation by Saturday. The only way we can stop this is by flooding their phones with calls and jamming as many people as possible into the site!

    People you need to be calling ASAP: Johnathan Mallahan- City Code Enforcement Director- 509.625.6734 Mayor Mary Verner- 509.625.6250 City Counsel- 509.625.6255 Joe Shogan is Counsel President KXLY- 509.324.4000 KREM- 509.838.7350 KHQ Newsroom- 509.448.4656

    Let them know that we want to come to an agreement that works for everyone, but we are not leaving. Election time is coming up and no one wants to upset the voters! We ask our allies around the nation to give us you support and a few minutes of your time, please call… Please share this on your Facebook page! Do everything you can think of! We need your support now more than ever!”

  • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

    I HAVE CALLED AND EMAILED THE MAYOR, CITY COMPLAINT OFFICE, CITY ATTORNEY, AND THE POLICE DEPARTMENT AS A CITIZEN OF DOWNTOWN SEATTLE WHO WANTS YOU ALL ARRESTED AFTER THE 10PM CURFEW. I agree with your right to protest and waste your time during the day, but leave at night. Your collective intelligence is like a nightlight..you can only expect it to shine a little.

    • DomJolly says:

      ” Your collective intelligence is like a nightlight..you can only expect it to shine a little.”
      Really? How long did you spend rubbing your neurons together to spark such an embarrassingly stupid comment? All of your posts show a clear disdain for the causes and efforts of the occupy movement, yet you champion yourself as an “ambitious” person. Congrats on going to grad school and ‘doing everything right.’ (You’re such a maverick!) Yet you’re even more dumb than I thought if you’re content to sit back and watch congress and wall street collude in questionable practices that are screwing over America, and furthermore, mock those who dare to challenge their practices. Wake up son, there are lots of hard working people out there who can’t stand what our country has become, and here’s the kicker: they’re ambitious too! They work hard, AND they’re actually willing to go out, collectivize, and enact change! All while you sit on your couch and make snide remarks about smelly hippies. You clearly paint your world in vivid shades of ‘us’ and ‘them.’ You’re the perfect Tea Party member, convinced that ALL liberal protesters just want a free ride- contrasted by YOU, a hard-worker who will someday ‘boss people around.’ Good luck with that, considering you enjoy ‘wasting’ so much of your time on these boards, arguing with dirty hippies. However will you get ahead?!? Fyi, the qualities that make for a good troll are the opposite of those possessed by good leadership.

  • WhiteElk says:

    I can’t get down to Seattle to march very often. I support the Movement! I’ve been planning for Oct 15th for some time. I wish to march for Occupy Seattle, not Occupy Westlake. I will still march. Just need to meet up with the other 99% who share this view.

  • MCFADDEN_LIVES says:

    Troll. Don’t feed it past this reply.

    • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

      Yeah I’m not a troll. You’re just a hippie who wants something for nothing. Good luck with that. Have fun wasting your time out there though.

      • ANON2012 says:

        if you go there to look for older people, you’ll see older people… it’s all about your perception of the people there. Every walk of life is there and that’s awesome that so many different kinds of people can walk together in solidarity.

  • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:
  • theuglyvirgin says:

    Because of the loss of our family business and the distance to down town Seattle, we have to go on Saturday only so we hope other families outside of Seattle will join Occupy Seattle in solidarity this weekend. The major media outlets, controlled by corporations, don’t want to cover the movement but in numbers, they cannot ignore us as easily. They would be displaying an obviously corporate bias, by not covering the movement if we are there in support, in large numbers. Make them hear Seattle and the rest of our 99% in America!

  • Shadouwolf says:

    Just because people have decided to try and camp Westlake does not mean they have lost sight of this movement. They feel its a way to get the word out. Just because they are camping does not mean you have to. I have been down as much and as late as I can, but I cannot stay overnight as much as I would like to. I have 2 young children I have to care for, but this does not keep me from joining them in solidarity. Do not let something so silly as people camping stop you from showing Seattle, let alone the world that you are outraged. You are right…this is about more than tents. So stop letting it be. by NOT coming down it is you that has then made it about tents.
    @Iheart…this is not about getting something for free. it is about making it a fair system again. the gap between rich and the rest of us has been greatly increased since the 80′s. I can tell you it is not from peoples lack of ambition or drive to do better. Why bust Unions? Why are jobs expecting more from you and paying you less? maybe…just maybe it is so those CEO’s can get a bit of a boost in their bonus checks. How can you be ok with a company your tax dollars helped bail out gives its CEO a bonus check??? Anyone in the work force that gets below a “meets requirements” gets SHIT for a raise to help their struggling families…but we give billions to companies that are so poorly run they need large sums of cash and they get something. maybe you are one of those people and do not want “us” cutting into your check….

    • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

      No I’m a graduate student so I’m not worried about you cutting into my check. However, after graduate school I expect to be compensated for the loans and costs of school, and also for the initiative and effort I have put in. Do you by chance have anything intellectual to say besides the stereotypical and cliche rants that make you and your group look like pseudo-intellectuals who in reality have no idea what they’re talking about.

      • DomJolly says:

        “after graduate school I expect to be compensated for the loans and costs of school, and also for the initiative and effort I have put in.”

        Hahahahaha good one. Why don’t you graduate first, THEN criticize those who are out protesting for fair compensation, among other things.

        “Do you by chance have anything intellectual to say besides the stereotypical and cliche rants that make you and your group look like pseudo-intellectuals who in reality have no idea what they’re talking about.” (When asking a question, ‘intellectuals’ typically end it with a ?, fyi)

        So those stereotypical rants… the only ones I could find include your own- when called everyone hippies, and asked others to take a shower. You even pointed out that everyone at the protests fit perfectly into your ‘stereotypical views.’

    • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

      The ignorance of you and the rest of your group is really quite humorous.

      • DomJolly says:

        I’ll be over here laughing at the compound interest on your student loans. Better get busy, you ambitious capitalist you!

    • Geoff Occupy Briggs says:

      No we are not. The title of this post on the main Occupy Seattle page is “General Assembly approves October 15th: Night of 500 Tents!” It is that narrow focus that has drawn the criticism of so many supporters.

      I have been down numerous times and will continue to join the occupation. But it is my duty to the Occupy Movement as I see it that compels me to continue to urge the GA and the campers to pursue a different course. If an arrangement for permanent occupation is reached with the mayor and then the city reneges I will be the first to advocate direct action as an appropriate response. Now is the time to build our numbers. This course of action runs counter to that. To deny that is to ignore the evidence all these comments represent.

      • msc says:

        I agree, “Night of 500 Tents” is about tents, it is diluting the main focus, and is drawing criticism. Let’s draw more people to the cause, not turn them off.

  • Shadouwolf says:

    You speak of ignorance and intelligence…yet you use name calling. Way to put that college education to use.

    • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

      I’ve been down to your protest and saw you protesting today at the Grand Hyatt when Romney was there. If you want to talk about disrespectful look in the mirror. Don’t be mad at those who have succeeded. Daren’t Romney shouldn’t have been so successful! He should have stopped creating wealth and jobs. Oh and those evil corporations! It’s a shame that they were started and grew into successful enterprises. That’s so horrible. I’m sure you do the same thing if you owned a business. I could see it now..

      Occupy Seattle Protester who actually gets a job and then starts a business: “I’m going to close early today because you know what? I’m getting too busy and I don’t want to be so successful! And NO! I will not open up at another location because I don’t want to be successful and make so much money!”

      • EddieD says:

        Deluded little student who happened to have gotten an MBA thinks he will be a Captain Of Industry. The fact that you come on this site and won’t leave says so much how insecure you are. Let me you tell you this. I have met your professors, I have met business professionals struggling who have years more experience than you, I have met successful businessman much more successful than you marching with us just out of conscience. You go masturbate now.

        • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

          Yeah not getting an MBA but thanks nice try. Go whine and waste your time while I actually use my time to advance myself. Take a shower while you’re at it too.

          • EddieD says:

            Little kids advance from 6th grade to 7th grade. I didn’t know you were in junior school. You obviously don’t know the real world outside school. I hope you wise up.

          • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

            Hmmm yeah except for I do and I actually have a job AND go to school and I have previous work experience. In fact, one day I will probably be the boss of at least one or several of you because I’m **gasp** ambitious and achievement oriented. You and your comrades on the other hand choose to waste your time at rallies whose only lasting impact will be another Wikepedia page entry.

          • livinginthepast says:

            Good luck, pal. Reality catches up with everybody sooner or later. I’d be careful about pulling the creds out with such smug and pretentious abandon. Given what you’ve said here, it doesn’t sound like there’s much content to fill your empty book.

          • DomJolly says:

            How you have used any of the time you’ve spent here to ‘advance yourself.’ Because… to me it appears you’re just wasting your time trying to anger people… you know like how a 5 year old pushes his babysitter’s buttons to see what he can get away with? Please grow up and act like the ‘grad student’ you proclaim to be, not the juvenile you appear to be.

        • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

          Oh any by the way, I’ve met a lot of your people too at the protests since I live in Downtown Seattle and can’t avoid you. Let me just say that my preconceived notions are only furthered by talking to the people out there who fit the stereotype of what I would expect. And don’t think that stereotype is a positive one.

        • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

          Also, I keep posting on here because I think you are all funny..except I’m laughing at you not with you. Hey EddieD I think I found a picture of you at the protest today: http://media.photobucket.com/image/typical%20liberal%20protester/LDCuploads07/Protest.png

      • ANON2012 says:

        ARE small business owners, I am. I don’t take advantage of people, I sell fair trade food, organic foods and make a point to not work too hard. I love my life and I have time for my family and friends, heck, even time to help my neighbors.

        Not everyone sees “success” in terms of dollar bills hun.

        More people every day are seeing that our focus of success is misguided, it leaves more and more people unhappy, stressed and mentally depressed.

        Success is measured in morality… Do those corporations have morality? Of course not, they feed on us unrelenting. Are they successful? Absolutely not.

        I’m sorry you aren’t for standing up and using your rights given to us. Some people just can’t hack it and that’s ok – we still love you.

        • Adi says:

          I have been “silently” observing the posts related to the IHEARTCAPITALISM’s comments. I must say, the best route is to just ignore her or his comments. Use Skinnerian operant conditioning tactics! Extinguish, i.e., do not reinforce the behavior with comments about it. All the comments serve to reinforce this person to keep posting.
          Also, if you are not willing to put your name on a post, I am not going to take you seriously! This forum gives us anonymity and this is great for people to be able to speak up. However, if you are not willing to state your name, or any part of it, I am concerned that you do not truly stand behind your comments. It is about integrity!

          Best,

          Adi

    • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:
  • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011

    Mayor’s statements on Occupy Seattle
    Mayor McGinn has shown support for the goals of Occupy Seattle to address growing inequality. But as the mayor, he must protect public safety and the public interest in park spaces, while ensuring that individuals can express their constitutional rights to free speech and assembly. For his approach see:

    http://mayormcginn.seattle.gov/update-on-occupy-seattle-oct-11/

    http://mayormcginn.seattle.gov/update-on-occupy-seattle-oct-9/

    http://mayormcginn.seattle.gov/update-on-occupy-seattle/

  • ellemac says:

    I have to agree with most of what I’ve seen posted here. The focus needs to stay on the national/international solidarity. This movement has caught the interest of people who are not typically inclined to participat in political protests. They are talking about it in the break room and printing articles and sharing tweets with each other. There is great potential in that. You could tap into it if you remember that this is just the beginning and not everyone who supports this movement and wants to get involved can attend the GAs.

    Today, several people at work, including myself, who had planned to participate in the Saturday’s Global Day of Action have now changed their minds. What you are planning is not about solidarity with the world’s 99%, it’s about a pissing contest with the city. I cannot support that. I have high hopes for the Occupy movement, but the GA needs to pick better battles and remember – this has just begun. If you don’t, the movement could easily fissle, and that would be a shame.

  • alocal says:

    I think some people should set up at City Hall. Organize from a place where we don’t have to be worried about being arrested and march to anywhere in the city we like. Including to Westlake in support of those who want to stay there no matter what.
    I think a safe place to organize would be invaluable. We could focus on growing a weekly march and coordinating with other Occupy groups. Not to mention provide a place for those who support the movement but aren’t willing/able to be in a confrontation with the police over where to put our tents.

    • DomJolly says:

      I would be down there tonight with my tent and plenty of supplies (I just spent the past month camping around the West Coast), if I could do so without fear of being arrested or hassled. I’m waiting for this to get sorted out before getting involved further.

  • Aristokronik anarkist says:

    Occupy Seattle “To Do” List: Occupy seattle direct action faction requests solidarity for occupy Hedge fund commodity speculator fronted offices locally based, cheating workers out of 70% of work and getting tax break while repressing working families left to pay 28% tax base on 1/3 of pay. http://www.Freezerlonglinecoalition,Bering sea cod co-op., Alaska Longline COd commision, Marine steward council for issuing a sustainable award to fleetof bering sea fishingboats fronting for numerous speculators that force a policy of “by catch Pummeling that cause genocides of western aleutian island fishing areas due to refusal of company to spend extra 20 seconds heading and gutting a cheaper fish that could provide protein to presently starving world.STOP THE BY-CATCH KILLERS!.COM

  • Aristokronik anarkist says:

    Occupy Bartell Drug Main office to simply inform the ceo/owner-”using 9/11 patriot act grants to enforce “no bathroom”policy with violent security guards will not go unnoticed in local community.Especially when subsidies and tax breaks and write offs for Healthcare Middlemen are supposed to benefit local communtiy not persecute with impunity…email above if bro-down or sista resista! keep it simple..no cussing ,no irrational yelling,no breaking of anything..just go in and inform of concern.with signs
    Stop the Repressive persecution of civilized needs of bathroom use.tax breaks are to benefit local community.ENd corporate fascist subsidies ..BOYCOTT BARTELL DRUGs. civil rights violator,constitutional rights violator, Discipline Greed

  • Aristokronik anarkist says:

    Occupy Bartell Drug Main office to simply inform the ceo/owner-”using 9/11 patriot act grants to enforce “no bathroom”policy with violent security guards will not go unnoticed in local community.Especially when subsidies and tax breaks and write offs for Healthcare Middlemen are supposed to benefit local communtiy not persecute with impunity…email above if bro-down or sista resista! keep it simple..no cussing ,no irrational yelling,no breaking of anything..just go in and inform of concern.with signs
    Stop the Repressive persecution of civilized needs of bathroom use.tax breaks are to benefit local community.ENd corporate fascist subsidies ..BOYCOTT BARTELL DRUGs. civil rights violator,constitutional rights violator, Discipline Greed

  • TomD says:

    Let’s not make this about occupying Westlake Park. The issue is so much broader. It’s about the evil of greed, and Westlake is not a symbol of that. It’s a public park. I was down there last Saturday, and hoped to come again this weekend. I would occupy the Bank of America lobby at Dexter Horton Banking Center. I would occupy the lobby of Goldman Sachs on 2nd Ave. but not Westlake Park. What’s the point?

    I’d like to hear why being arrested for occupying a public park is what we would like to see on the news, how this will help our movement. Especially now that we have been given a reasonable alternative by a seemingly sympathetic mayor.

  • daneweb says:
  • Michu says:

    If we really need to rally in front of a building that symbolizes greed then there is the Federal Reserves in Renton. Westlake is a great spot because of accessibility. People converge at West lake and it is considered the “heart” of downtown. As far as corporations, if you look around there is Chase Bank across the street, and a slew of retail corporations that is driven by wanting to sell you more “stuff” that you probably do not need.

  • Michu says:

    Thanks you sweetcheeks!

  • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:
    • LiftTheVeil says:

      I find it quite sad that people like you can only make blanket accusations about folks that you don’t agree with. Why can’t you understand that this movement isn’t about doing away with corporations or not using their products? (although if push comes to shove, a little boycotting wouldn’t hurt the cause) Come on man, that’s what you think this is about?! In this day and age, it’s pretty hard to stay ahead in this world without the use of many everyday products. The ironic thing is that the advancement in technology is allowing us to assemble and connect like no other movement in history. Seems like Karma to me :) And let’s face it, if everyone made their own clothes and didn’t use technology, you would get going with the “hippie” “stoner” label for everyone….which many people like you have done already.

      With that said, do we just stand by and grant huge corporations the power to influence government policy and buy political candidates? Can’t you even see that that is what got us here!?!?

      The single most important change I would like to see is overturning the “Citizens United” ruling that grants corporations unlimited spending toward political fundraising. We need to get the money out of Washington and bring back real advocacy for the people of this great country. That is something that even you should believe in. If you don’t, well…go get some ear-plugs to help you sleep, cause we’re gonna be out here for as long as it takes to wake up the rest of the 99%…including you :)

      • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

        That’s cool. I’ve emailed the mayor, city attorney, and the cops, and I’ve also called the complaint line. I plan on sending these emails and making calls everyday, and I will also have everyone I know do the same. Hopefully tonight they will start arresting you. If not tonight, they will soon. :) Do let me know how jail is though OK? I bet the prison orange will be a good look for you.

      • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

        Oh and it’s not a matter of time until I “wake up.” Unlike you, I have a life and I don’t sit there and whine and complain. See there’s the one percent..then there’s the one percent of people like you..and there’s the 98%. The 98% are the people that are normal. So really your movement should say I’m the other 1%..that’s soon to be in jail..hahahaha.

        • DomJolly says:

          You have a life? This may be true, but DAMN is it a lame one. You claim to be in grad school and have life figured out, yet you spam this board with comments about calling hotlines to try and get protesters arrested, as if that will be some sort of victory for you. Curious, as a champion of CAPITALISM, did you consider the bail-outs a victory? Or an abysmal failure of our capitalist system to avoid market-socialism? Who are you here to defend?

  • Occupy 24-7 says:

    This is the name for an event on Facebook that will be happening this Saturday!!! Check it out for more details let’s have another student march from the UW!

  • office dude says:

    While I’m impressed that folks want to take back Westlake, I do not think that pitching 500 tents is a good idea. As has been said it seems like our esteemed Mayor’s only real issue, will invite confrontation, and doesn’t do anything to get the vast majority of the 99% involved. Occupying Westlake as opposed to City Hall, however, is at least more conducive to that because it’s close to the town’s business center. We need the office workers, waiters and waitresses, customer service people, retail workers, taxi cab drivers, etc to be there showing their support. Also, to be practical, large amounts of people by their very presence will protect campers from arrest. Tents won’t get them there. Obviously, we have jobs but we’re also screwed by the banks, have either crappy healthcare or none (you be shocked how folks in ties and scrubs are uninsured), and are extremely worried for our future. Instead of tents, can we narrow down the goals? For me, the most important ones are: corporate accountability (including prosecution for the financial meltdown), the end of expensive wars (Iraq, Afghanistan, and actions in Pakistan have cost more than 3 TRILLION dollars [Reuters]), affordable healthcare, and reform of a ludicrous tax code. Also, maybe some outreach is order to get all those folks walking by Westlake to stop and hang out for a few hours. McFadden_Lives and a lot of others have the right idea; I just wanted to add my voice to theirs.

    • DomJolly says:

      It just seems to be an unnecessary risk, and when a movement is this fragile why force such a confrontation? Its not too late to consider the occupation of City Hall as a win, and have a dual occupation, one during the day and one during the night. It would help keep things clean, and would be a great basis from which to move forward. Alternatively a 500 tent sit in could end in violence or any other number of unwanted consequences.

    • gilbazoid says:

      office dude, I totally agree with you. I think we’re losing sight of the message, and we need to do more to engage the community, especially downtown.

      However, just to put this in perspective… There are only something like 50 protestors actually staying overnight in Westlake. They have been deprived of shelter, cover from unused overhangs and on Monday, the police repeatedly woke them to deprive them of sleep. They are worried about campers getting hypothermia, about trying to stay dry and warm. The people who are bearing a lot of responsibilities for keeping the camp running, especially in the wee hours have worked themselves to the bone. They are especially sleep deprived and on edge. They would Really, Really like to have more people down there camping, both for safety in numbers and to ease their personal burden.

      We should try to both engage people and support the protestors already there. We need to keep focus or the spirit of the movement will be lost. But we also need more people to support better infrastructure or people themselves will be lost.

      • IHEARTCAPITALISM says:

        It’s only a matter of time before this all falls apart. Either you will be arrested, or you will kept up and not allowed shelter etc. which will make the cause slowly wither. Either way should be fun to watch.

  • Michu says:

    I have not seen any posting as to what might happen if the crowd or tents spill over Westlake?

  • Bradford B. Morrison says:

    Well, folks, guess what??…we need to add something VERY VERY important to our list of “demands”. It’s very much needed, and it’s a bit uncool to do it in the alley. Simply put…WE GOTTA PEE SOMEWHERE, at WESTLAKE PARK!!

    How about we get the mayor to make the Parks Department BRING BACK OUR SANICANS, (at least two of them, maybe more), and also MAKE THEM PUMP OUT OR REPLACE THEM WHEN THEY GET FULL!!!

    YEE HAW, I am typing this after coming home Thursday night at 11:30 pm, and LUCKY ME!, I NOW HAVE AN EMPTY BLADDER!…LOL!!

    HAVE A GREAT NIGHT EVERYONE 99% folks; occupy seattle folks; the Seattle police; Mayor McGinn; the Parks Department folks, and EVERYONE!!! I hope you get to PEE soon, if you haven’t already…LOL!!

    See ya will return by 1:30 am…keep those drums going if possible, be safe and above all, HAVE FUN whenever feasible!!

    Thanks for listening
    Peace and Love
    Brad Morrison

  • Bradford B. Morrison says:

    ADDENDUM to my previous post: Which is cheaper for city taxpayers:
    1) 56 Police officers, 5 park rangers, 3 paddy wagons,etc., OR
    2) TWO SANICANS WITH REPLACEMENTS WHEN THEY GET FULL OF PEE??
    3) PLEASE LAUGH AT MY JOKE, or I will be PISSED!!!…LOL! (just kidding) :-)

    Peace and Love
    Brad Morrison

  • karmashand35 says:

    If we keep protesting camping laws, we will lose support. I urge you to study the history of siege battle tactics. The tents were set up back and away from the front lines. Use city hall to sleep and to keep a prescence at a government center. Do this and assign shifts at Westlake to keep the park occupied. This solves most of the problems. Since the shifts occupying the park will be awake, they cannot say that you are camping. It will allow all of you to be better rested and stave off sickness. Finally, it will meet the mayor’s request and will leave them nothing to harass you about.

  • DS says:

    I think the symbolism of having a tent city erected is great since the average person is pushed more towards poverty and so many people have lost their homes recently.

    That being said, I think this Saturday should be the last of the tent focus and move onto bigger, better and more powerfull ideas for getting people into the movement.

    • kbj says:

      agree. great to dramatize the occupation and need for tents – but the 99% can occupy westlake without need to camp overnight. At some point we have to focus on the root problem, and see if we can’t make some progress working on a solution.

  • msc says:

    I am concerned about all the focus on the tents at Westlake. I feel this is taking the focus off the real issue. I also have concerns about Sat. Oct. 15th events. Zombies and burlesque??? Why?? What does that have to do with the issues?

    I was at the march last Sat. and thought it was fantastic, we brought some friends with us (all middle class, 50 yr, working, all in support of changes). I loved the variety of people. I loved seeing a soldier there. I don’t want the movement in Seattle to turn into a freak show. I want people to bring their families, young and old, like I saw at the march. I would think the more mainstream/middle class people you can get, the more respectability you will bring to Occupy Seattle.

    I will be down at Westlake tomorrow protesting for corporate change, political change, jobs, peace, but if the movement continues moving in the direction of “just bringing attention to Westlake Plaza and odd events”, I will not continue to come down and support the 99%. Respectfully, Cathy